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Started by yzhzhang, 12/12/2010 03:11PM
Posted 12/12/2010 03:11PM Opening Post
Hello all,

I am new to this forum, and also almost new to astronomy. I just bought my Celestron C80ED and a CG-5 mount. They actually will be on the way soon. Can anyone gives me some advice about EPs and other equipments? Also, I am kind of interested in doing some asrophotography with my equipments. Is there anywhere I can find a good tutorial for amateurs?

Thanks!
Yizhou
Posted 12/13/2010 08:34PM #1
Yizhou Zhang said:

Hello all,

I am new to this forum, and also almost new to astronomy. I just bought my Celestron C80ED and a CG-5 mount. They actually will be on the way soon. Can anyone gives me some advice about EPs and other equipments? Also, I am kind of interested in doing some asrophotography with my equipments. Is there anywhere I can find a good tutorial for amateurs?

Thanks!
Yizhou

Hello and Welcome to Astromart... grin Your C80ED with a CG-5 mount should be very good for astrophotography. Eyepieces are a big subject, many preferences, it is really a religion... For my 80mm APO, I like a range of eyepieces starting with a 2 inch about 30mm and some high power eyepieces that let me view at 160x or even a bit higher.

As far as a tutorial, I like this one, Jerry Lodriguss covers it all:

http://astropix.com/HTML/I_ASTROP/TOC_AP.HTM

http://astropix.com/


Best wishes

Jon Isaacs


Posted 12/25/2010 06:06PM #2
I generally like to start with an eyepiece that gives me the greatest field of view. In your scope, assuming it has a 1.25" diagonal, that would be a 32mm plossl at the low end of the price range, a 21mm Stratus in the mid-price range, and a 24mm Panoptic at the high end of the price range. All would give you about a 2.5° field of view. Although that could be increased to 3.5° with a 2" diagonal and other eyepieces, you would face balance issues with a heavy diagonal and eyepiece on one end of a relatively light-weight and short tube. But don't despair; 2.5° should be plenty for most objects.

"Praise the Lord for the expanding grandeur of creation, worlds known and unknown, galaxies beyond galaxies, filling us with awe and challenging our imaginations." 2007 Reform Siddur