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Visually Challenging Lunar Targets

Started by klawson, 07/03/2012 01:01PM
Posted 07/03/2012 01:01PM Opening Post
Does any one look at any challenging lunar targets like the Pi Kies dome pit or counting the craterlettes on the floor of Plato, Schiller, or Archimedes? Anyone seen the trailing craterlettes behind Messier A? Anyone seen the crater between Ritter and Sabine? How about the Cauchy dome pit or the central rille in the Alpine Valley? Aldrin, Collins and Armstrong?

Please post some of your successfully viewed lunar challenges.

Keith

Scopejunkie


40 year old restored C14 with recirculating cooling w/Skywatcher DOB GOTO Conversion (CPC14)

Synscan DOB mounted Sky-Watcher Evostar 150mm/1200mm ED Refractor

"Rescued" Craig's List Orion 120mm/1000mm Refractor


USAF Vet




 
Posted 07/03/2012 01:04PM #1
Interesting thread, Keith. Plato's craterletts are always a draw for me, and I've glimpsed the Rille in the Alpine Valley exactly once. This is one of those areas in observational astronomy that benefits from having a working list of things to try for. Of course it would also benefit from good seeing, something rare in my locale. Thanks for the post, and for the list!

Steve
Posted 07/03/2012 07:43PM #2
Keith Lawson said:

Does any one look at any challenging lunar targets like the Pi Kies dome pit or counting the craterlettes on the floor of Plato, Schiller, or Archimedes? Anyone seen the trailing craterlettes behind Messier A? Anyone seen the crater between Ritter and Sabine? How about the Cauchy dome pit or the central rille in the Alpine Valley? Aldrin, Collins and Armstrong?

Please post some of your successfully viewed lunar challenges.

Keith

With our light pollution and only an 80mm scope lunar observing is all I can enjoy. After a hiatus I've gotten out my U of Az Lunar and Planetary maps and with the Virtual Lunar Atlas, started observing recently. Any sources of appropriate challenges and projects beyond just getting re-acquainted with major lunar features?

Jim J

"Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good." - Thomas Sowell
Posted 07/05/2012 12:42AM #3
Lots of great challenges...how about how many of the Davy Craterlet chain (Catena Davy)can you see? Or an easier one...Hesodius A, a neat bullseye crater. Gerry
Posted 07/05/2012 07:06AM #4
How about the Ina Caldera L99. Being so shallow I could not discern it near the terminator. Seems it needs several degrees to light the opposite wall and make it visible.

Jud

I Yam What I Yam!
Posted 10/26/2012 04:40PM #5
During those nights of freezing cold, clouds, rain, or clear moonless nights, the following webset might help: wms.lroc.asu.edu./index.html
Posted 10/29/2012 09:52AM #6
With the weather we've had this fall, the moon is a visually challenging lunar target!

dan