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Jupiter and 5 moons

Started by kentkramer, 04/07/2005 09:10PM
Posted 04/07/2005 09:10PM Opening Post
Well the viewing tonight in Minnesota is/was possibly the best I have seen in 2 years. Steady skies, very transparent and dark. With my Mewlon 180 and a UO Ortho 12.5 and 25 I was able to see considerable detail in the banding on the planet. The 4 large moons were tight to the planet. Using the 25 a 5th moon was revealed about 2/3rds. of the way across the field of view. Did anyone else see this as well?

Kent
Posted 04/07/2005 09:36PM #1
Was it fainter than the 4 moons? It's possible it may have been a field star. According to my software it looks like it was SAO 138991 at Magnitude 8.99. I didn't have my scope out tonight. Too windy smile

Scopejunkie


40 year old restored C14 with recirculating cooling w/Skywatcher DOB GOTO Conversion (CPC14)

10" F/15 thermally managed ATM Coulter Cassegrain mounted on a Celestron C14 wedge to GEM conversion

Sky Watcher Evostar 150mm/1200mm ED Refractor mounted on a Celestron C14 wedge to GEM conversion

"Rescued" Craig's List Orion 120mm/1000mm Refractor


USAF Vet




 
Posted 04/07/2005 11:11PM | Edited 04/07/2005 11:12PM #2
We saw 6 moons a week ago around Jupiter with the Mt Wilson 60", but seeing was not great, though I did get moments of clarity where the bands showed details.
But Tuesday I got great views with 4 moons from my backyard and the 14.5" Starmaster. grin

[SIZE="Large"][/SIZE][COLOR="Blue"][/COLOR] Floyd Blue grin
Amateur Imager
Posted 04/08/2005 05:46AM #3
Kent- If I'm not mistaken, the 5th brightest moon of Jupiter is Amalthea at magnitude 14.1. I think Keith is right, it was a field star. Gerry
Posted 04/08/2005 10:57AM #4
What was the time of your observation? I think Amalthea was only 1 Jupiter radius away from the planet when you were observing Jupiter. At mag 14 Amalthea would have been very hard to see.

Scopejunkie


40 year old restored C14 with recirculating cooling w/Skywatcher DOB GOTO Conversion (CPC14)

10" F/15 thermally managed ATM Coulter Cassegrain mounted on a Celestron C14 wedge to GEM conversion

Sky Watcher Evostar 150mm/1200mm ED Refractor mounted on a Celestron C14 wedge to GEM conversion

"Rescued" Craig's List Orion 120mm/1000mm Refractor


USAF Vet




 
Posted 04/09/2005 08:48AM #5
Mike,

I agree that there is no way it was Amalthea. The position for one was in the area of 138991 and the second would be the brightness. The relative size I would estimate to be about one quarter of the disc size compared to the average size of the 4 largest moons. The thing that sticks in my mind though is the illuminated look of a moon as opposed to the point source of light that stars tend to exhibit. This object had that look. I did find a couple of resources on the internet that displayed the orbits of many of the Jovian moons. None seemed to be as distant as the object I observed.

I wish that I had better skies last night. Hopefully tonight. The change in the relative positions of the objects involved are going to make things more difficult or impossible as time goes on.

I appreciate everyones interest in helping to identify this.

Thanks,

Kent