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Common ground among the major religions...

Started by wpaolini, 05/02/2011 08:14AM
Posted 05/02/2011 08:14AM | Edited 05/02/2011 08:16AM Opening Post
We always have talk about the differences, what about the common grounds? In balance don't the similarities far far outweigh any differences?

As example, reported today on the "Express", a commuter paper by the Washington Post in an article titled, "Church a Refuge for Storm Victims", it went to say the major role that local churches are playing in the devestation in the US from tornados across the south. How people are going to the churches after services just to give thanks. How the churches are the organization points for relief and as community centers.

Also nice to see how the different faiths have no barriers: "Macolee Muhammed accepted the prayer of a relief worker who stopped by what was left of her Birmingham home. It didn't matter that she was Muslim and he was Southern Baptist. 'If you came here to help, the only person who sent you was God.' she said"

So while the debate in the forums here at times makes one think there is this great divide and great disharmony, in reality and in the real world when it is faithful meeting faithful, the vast majority of time there is only acceptance and harmony.

When I cross paths with others of other religions, all I generally focus on is what we have in common, belief in God, love of God, and being part of an organization that does so much good in the local community and well beyond. That has always been an effective rallying point.
Posted 05/02/2011 09:41AM #1
William Paolini said:

We always have talk about the differences, what about the common grounds? In balance don't the similarities far far outweigh any differences?

As example, reported today on the "Express", a commuter paper by the Washington Post in an article titled, "Church a Refuge for Storm Victims", it went to say the major role that local churches are playing in the devestation in the US from tornados across the south. How people are going to the churches after services just to give thanks. How the churches are the organization points for relief and as community centers.

Also nice to see how the different faiths have no barriers: "Macolee Muhammed accepted the prayer of a relief worker who stopped by what was left of her Birmingham home. It didn't matter that she was Muslim and he was Southern Baptist. 'If you came here to help, the only person who sent you was God.' she said"

So while the debate in the forums here at times makes one think there is this great divide and great disharmony, in reality and in the real world when it is faithful meeting faithful, the vast majority of time there is only acceptance and harmony.

When I cross paths with others of other religions, all I generally focus on is what we have in common, belief in God, love of God, and being part of an organization that does so much good in the local community and well beyond. That has always been an effective rallying point.

I think the acceptance and harmony you speak of only comes about when the truth is cloaked by common human need that comes to the forefront at times of disaster. A common belief in God is a very generic concept with a very thin veil. Scratch just a little bit and you will have to deal with the differences in various faith's God(s). From there the acceptance and harmony breaks down unless you simply deny the differences and/or set your beliefs aside which can be hard to do for certain religions that are very exclusive in nature like Christianity and Islam.

Doug Matulis
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"I need something to put here, can you help? wink "
Posted 05/02/2011 03:32PM | Edited 05/02/2011 03:35PM #2
William Paolini said:

We always have talk about the differences, what about the common grounds? In balance don't the similarities far far outweigh any differences?

As example, reported today on the "Express", a commuter paper by the Washington Post in an article titled, "Church a Refuge for Storm Victims", it went to say the major role that local churches are playing in the devestation in the US from tornados across the south. How people are going to the churches after services just to give thanks. How the churches are the organization points for relief and as community centers.

Also nice to see how the different faiths have no barriers: "Macolee Muhammed accepted the prayer of a relief worker who stopped by what was left of her Birmingham home. It didn't matter that she was Muslim and he was Southern Baptist. 'If you came here to help, the only person who sent you was God.' she said"

So while the debate in the forums here at times makes one think there is this great divide and great disharmony, in reality and in the real world when it is faithful meeting faithful, the vast majority of time there is only acceptance and harmony.

When I cross paths with others of other religions, all I generally focus on is what we have in common, belief in God, love of God, and being part of an organization that does so much good in the local community and well beyond. That has always been an effective rallying point.

Hmmm... commonalities...

We're all here in this life and experience the world around us. Nobody has argued that point with me.

If I claim not to be a Christian, it is only in the sense of an organised religion. I'm obviously no fan of regimented religion. However, the teachings of Jesus are of great value to me and I would hope I behave accordingly. My charitable works are typically person to person rather than via any specific program.

It was interesting to find out (on this forum) that my philosphy is Spinozian, my view of God is much the same as Islamic belief, and we all get emotional on occasion.

It's all the attached dogma that seems to cause the uproar. Was Paul right? Did James go to India? Did Mary Magdalen learn to write? Was Mohammed a Profit... and so on. These are details my friends, and comprise only a small fraction of the input guiding our daily behavior.

If our purpose in writing here is out of concern for the spiritual well being of our fellow man, we are more active than most in our common regard for each other.

Thanks,
Steve
8)