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Is your God different from my God?

Started by wpaolini, 05/11/2011 11:31AM
Posted 05/11/2011 11:31AM Opening Post
For the three major religions we usually deal with, Islam, Christianity, and Judaism, are the characteristics of God as described in the scriptures from each of these religions, different in any way?

So does any passage in texts from the Islamic scriptures/sacred texts, as example, protray God differently in any fundamental way how scriptures/sacred texts portray God in Christianity, or in Judaisms?

These three religions are supposed to be referencing the same God, so do any of them portray God differently in some fundamental way? If not a fundamental way then in some minor way? If you don't have the references to back up your points, or if the points you provide are your understanding based on what you've come to know about the religions that are not yours, would appreciate that you make that fact clear so we don't have any misunderstandings. IMO it is also valuable to voice what we might have as an understanding based on media or discussion, then hopefully someone who practices the said religion can set us straight one way or the other and give us some references.

For me, I don't have any understanding that the God of Judaism and the God of Christianity are any different in character, motive, or action from each other at all. I don't feel as firmly about Islam though, not based on any evidence from their texts, but just the way the popular American media and culture reacts most of the time makes one feel there must be some fundamental differences -- I certainly don't see any differences based on what I observe from my family members who are Muslims as they paint quite a different picture than th media/popular culture does. So not talking the practices of the adherents to the religion, but talking the source texts which define the religion. Are there any differences to be found there?
Posted 05/11/2011 01:41PM | Edited 05/11/2011 01:44PM #1
William Paolini said:

For the three major religions we usually deal with, Islam, Christianity, and Judaism, are the characteristics of God as described in the scriptures from each of these religions, different in any way?

So does any passage in texts from the Islamic scriptures/sacred texts, as example, protray God differently in any fundamental way how scriptures/sacred texts portray God in Christianity, or in Judaisms?

These three religions are supposed to be referencing the same God, so do any of them portray God differently in some fundamental way? If not a fundamental way then in some minor way? If you don't have the references to back up your points, or if the points you provide are your understanding based on what you've come to know about the religions that are not yours, would appreciate that you make that fact clear so we don't have any misunderstandings. IMO it is also valuable to voice what we might have as an understanding based on media or discussion, then hopefully someone who practices the said religion can set us straight one way or the other and give us some references.

For me, I don't have any understanding that the God of Judaism and the God of Christianity are any different in character, motive, or action from each other at all. I don't feel as firmly about Islam though, not based on any evidence from their texts, but just the way the popular American media and culture reacts most of the time makes one feel there must be some fundamental differences -- I certainly don't see any differences based on what I observe from my family members who are Muslims as they paint quite a different picture than th media/popular culture does. So not talking the practices of the adherents to the religion, but talking the source texts which define the religion. Are there any differences to be found there?

Hi William,
Of the three major religions of the western world, Christianity departs the most from a monotheistic God. They don't abandon the idea, but have added on so much that "God the Father" now seems to sit in the background.

From what I understand, both from Catholisism, my Jewish friends and recent exchanges here. All three religions hold God (the creator) above all else as singular and infinite without birth or death.

Most controversy lies in variations concerning who he speaks to, getting angry, selecting favorites, doing things that seem so mysterious and so on. Like many people, I believe these aspects have been made up by a people less educated than we are. These factors also introduce a great deal of doubt amongst those who view such attributes as immature or unecessary.

Teaching these bare facts at pre-seminary actually backfires on the Catholics, as many depart their traditional studies at that point and seek God independently. Myself included.

Anything infinite would have to be singular and inclusive of all things or it would be somewhat less than infinite. By our logic and mathematics this is a fact by definition.

I'm rewriting my essay on Universal Divinity and will re-post it in the Philosphy Articles soon. You can read the old one. Even if you don't have a matching set of beliefs to my own, it might be entertaining.

Is my God different from you God? No, we just quibble over the details.

Steve
8)
Posted 05/12/2011 07:37AM #2
William Paolini said:

For the three major religions we usually deal with, Islam, Christianity, and Judaism, are the characteristics of God as described in the scriptures from each of these religions, different in any way?

So does any passage in texts from the Islamic scriptures/sacred texts, as example, protray God differently in any fundamental way how scriptures/sacred texts portray God in Christianity, or in Judaisms?

These three religions are supposed to be referencing the same God, so do any of them portray God differently in some fundamental way? If not a fundamental way then in some minor way? If you don't have the references to back up your points, or if the points you provide are your understanding based on what you've come to know about the religions that are not yours, would appreciate that you make that fact clear so we don't have any misunderstandings. IMO it is also valuable to voice what we might have as an understanding based on media or discussion, then hopefully someone who practices the said religion can set us straight one way or the other and give us some references.

For me, I don't have any understanding that the God of Judaism and the God of Christianity are any different in character, motive, or action from each other at all. I don't feel as firmly about Islam though, not based on any evidence from their texts, but just the way the popular American media and culture reacts most of the time makes one feel there must be some fundamental differences -- I certainly don't see any differences based on what I observe from my family members who are Muslims as they paint quite a different picture than th media/popular culture does. So not talking the practices of the adherents to the religion, but talking the source texts which define the religion. Are there any differences to be found there?

The Jewish God and the Christian God are one and the same.

The god if Islam is not the same God of the Jewish and Christian Bible. The god of Islam is very different. Islam rejects the Triune God of the Bible made up of three parts or persons, The Father, The Son, and the Holy Spirit. All three equal in their diety, yet three unique parts. Islam rejects that Jesus is God and part of the 'Godhead'. In Islam Jesus is a prophet or teacher. As far as I know, Islam has no concept of the Holy Spirit.

Doug Matulis
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"I need something to put here, can you help? wink "
Posted 05/14/2011 05:26AM #3
William Paolini said:

For the three major religions we usually deal with, Islam, Christianity, and Judaism, are the characteristics of God as described in the scriptures from each of these religions, different in any way?

So does any passage in texts from the Islamic scriptures/sacred texts, as example, protray God differently in any fundamental way how scriptures/sacred texts portray God in Christianity, or in Judaisms?

These three religions are supposed to be referencing the same God, so do any of them portray God differently in some fundamental way? If not a fundamental way then in some minor way? If you don't have the references to back up your points, or if the points you provide are your understanding based on what you've come to know about the religions that are not yours, would appreciate that you make that fact clear so we don't have any misunderstandings. IMO it is also valuable to voice what we might have as an understanding based on media or discussion, then hopefully someone who practices the said religion can set us straight one way or the other and give us some references.

For me, I don't have any understanding that the God of Judaism and the God of Christianity are any different in character, motive, or action from each other at all. I don't feel as firmly about Islam though, not based on any evidence from their texts, but just the way the popular American media and culture reacts most of the time makes one feel there must be some fundamental differences -- I certainly don't see any differences based on what I observe from my family members who are Muslims as they paint quite a different picture than th media/popular culture does. So not talking the practices of the adherents to the religion, but talking the source texts which define the religion. Are there any differences to be found there?

I am 46 years old and never realized this. How could I overlook this incredibly important and obvious fact? I feel really humbled right now......

This begs the question of why there is so much conflict? If the three religions believe in the same god, but do so in slightly different ways, why do the different religions "fight" with eachother?
Posted 05/17/2011 06:27AM #4
William, I didn't follow this thread so I may be repeating what someone else said, but I suspect that your view of Islam based on your relatives is considerably more valid than the impressions given by the "media". I suspect that the so-called "media", rather than informing people, gives a very distorted picture of the world. I consider the American media the "lowest" of the legal professions :C and the less an individual exposes themselves to it, the better.

[COLOR="Blue"]Darian Rachal[/COLOR]