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Posts Made By: Carlos E. Hernandez

March 3, 2004 09:34 PM Forum: Solar System Observing

Jupiter Observation (March 3, 2004)

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I made an detailed observation of Jupiter under very good (8/10) seeing conditions. I was fortunate to have experienced a break in the clouds during this observation considering our erratic South Florida weather. The view of a highly detailed Jupiter Callisto and Ganymede on either side was spectacular! I welcome any comments on my observation.

Date (U.T.): March 3, 2004
Time (U.T.): 06:00
L1 201.7, L2 079.6, L3 006.2
Instrument: 9-inch (23-cm) F/13.5 Maksutov-Cassegrain
Magnification: 257x
Filters: None
Seeing (1-10): 8, Antoniadi (I-V): II
Transparency (1-6): 5

Notes:
South Polar Region (SPR): Appears dusky to dull (4-5/10) and finely mottled.
South South Temperate Zone (SSTZ): Appears bright and broad with indefinite borders.
South South Temperate Belt (SSTB): Appears as a thin, dull (5/10) band following the CM.
South Temperate Zone (STZ): Appears bright (7/10) and complex with four very bright (8/10) ovals noted within it.
South Temperate Belt (STB): Appears thin and dark (3/10) and deviating towards the south preceding the CM.
South Tropical Zone (STrZ): Appears bright (7/10) with a small, dusky (4/10) condensation over it's preceding half (very thin, dull (5/10) projections noted from it's p. and f. borders). A dusky (4/10), broad band is noted to extend from the following border of the Great Red Spot (GRS).
Great Red Spot (GRS, center at L2 090.4, L3 17.1): Appears dusky (4/10) with a dark (3/10) core and a dark (3/10) southern border. Dark (3/10) projections are noted to connect to it from the SEB.
South Equatorial Belt (SEB): Appears complex with dark (3/10) northern and southern borders interlaced with bright (7/10) regions.
Equatorial Belt (EB): Appears bright (7/10) with dusky to dull (4-5/10) condensations and bands noted within it.
North Equatorial Belt (NEB): Appears thin and dark to dusky (3-4/10). Very dark to dark (2-3/10) festoons were noted along it's southern border (NEBs). A dark (3/10) projection was noted to extend from it's southern border apparently connecting to a thin, dull (5/10) band within the NTrZ. A dark (3/10) barge (or rod) was noted along it's southern border following the CM.
North Tropical Zone (NTrZ): Appears bright (7/10) with a dark (3/10) projection extending from the NEBn connecting to a dull (5/10) band.
North Polar Region (NPR): Appears dusky to dull (4-5/10) with a dark (3/10), irregular border and fine mottling noted within.

Callisto (IV) was visible preceding the planet at the approximate latitude of the SSTB. Ganymede (III) was visible close to the following disk at the level of the STrZ (It was occulted by the planet at 06:15 U.T.).

Transit Timings:
06:15 U.T. Disappearance (occultation) of Ganymede (III)
06:18 U.T. L2 090.4, L3 017.1, Center of the Great Red Spot (GRS)
06:35 U.T. L2 100.7, L3 027.4, Following border of GRS

The best of luck observing and imaging Jupiter.

Regards,
Carlos E. Hernandez


March 28, 2004 11:58 PM Forum: Solar System Observing

Jupiter Observation (March 28, 2004)

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I made an observation tonight under average (5-6/10) seeing conditions with steadier moments (7/10) at times. The entire jovian disk exhibited much detail. The four Galiean satellites were aligned curiously on either side of the planet in preparation for the triple transit which I missed later in the night. I welcome any comments on my observation.

Date (U.T.): Mach 28, 2004
Time (U.T.): 04:25
L1 134.0, L2 181.6, L3 114.9
Instrument: 9-inch (23-cm) F/13.5 Maksutov-Cassegrain
Magnification: 258x and 388x
Filters: None (IL)
Seeing (1-10): 5-6 (moments of 7), Antoniadi (I-V): III
Transparency (1-6): 3-4 (intermittent clouds)

Notes:
South Polar Region (SPR): Appeared dusky to dull (4-5/10) and mottled.
South South Temperate Zone (SSTZ): Appeared shaded (6/10) and thin.
South South Temperate Belt (SSTB): Appeared dusky (4/10) and thin.
South Temperate Zone (STZ): Appeared bright (7/10) and thin. Oval BE appeared bright (7/10) and surrounded by a dark (3/10) collar towards the preceding limb.
South Temperate Belt (STB): Appeared dark (3/10) and thin.
South Tropical Zone (STrZ): Appeared bright (7/10) without any other detail visible within.
South Equatorial Belt (SEB): Appeared dark to dusky (3-4/10) with a thin, bright (7/10) zone (SEBZ) separating the northern and southern components.
Equatorial Zone (EZ): Appeared bright (7/10) with dark to dull (3-5/10) festoon projections (loops) noted within.
North Equatorial Belt (NEB): Appeared dark to dusky (3-4/10) with bright (7/10) condensations and rifts noted within it. Very dark to dark (2-3/10) festoon bases were noted along the southern border (NEBs). A very bright (8/10) bay was noted along the northern border (NEBn) preceding the CM.
North Tropical Zone (NTrZ): Appears bright (7/10) without any detail visible within.
North Polar Region (NPR): Appears dusky to dull (4-5/10) with thin bands and zones noted within. This region also appears mottled.

The following Galilean satellites were observed from preceding to following; Europa, Callisto, Ganymede and Io.

The best of luck in your own observations/imaging of Jupiter.

Regards,
Carlos E. Hernandez

March 29, 2004 09:55 AM Forum: Solar System Observing

Saturn Observation (March 29, 2004)

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I made an observation of Saturn under good seeing conditions (6-7/10). Much detail was noted over the globe as well as the rings as evident in my observation. I welcome any comments on my observation.

Date (U.T.): March 29, 2004
Time (U.T.): 01:30
L1 325.2, L2 226.4. L3 092.3
Instrument: 9-inch (23-cm) F/13.5 Maksutov-Cassegrain
Magnification: 258x and 388x
Seeing (1-10): 6-7 (moments of 8-9), Antoniadi (I-V): II
Transparency (1-6): 5-6

Notes:
South Polar Region (SPR): Appears dusky to dull (4-5/10) with a central dark (3/10) condensation surrounded by a shaded (6/10) inner collar.
South Temperate Band (STB): Appears dull (5/10) and wide with a slight greenish tinge surrounding the SPR.
South Tropical (or Temperate) Zone (STZ): Appears shaded (6/10) and broad without detail visible within.
South Equatorial Belt (SEB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) and broad with dark (3/10) condensations noted along the northern and southern borders.
Equatorial Zone (EZ): Appears bright (7/10) with a thin, dull (5/10) band across the center.

Ring A: Appears shaded (6/10) with the Encke division (or minima) visible over the entire aspect of the ring.
Ring B: Appears bright (7/10) over it's outer half and dusky to dull (4-5/10) over it's inner half.
Ring C: Appears shaded (6/10) over the inner ansae and dull (5/10) across the EZ.

The best of luck in your own observations/imaging of Saturn.

Regards,
Carlos E. Hernandez

April 4, 2004 03:09 PM Forum: Solar System Observing

Jupiter Observation (April 4, 2004)

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I made an observation of Jupiter this morning under average seeing conditions (5/10) with moments of 6-7/10. Detail was noted especially over the SSTZ/STB (including oval BE), EZ. and the NEB. I welcome any comments on my observation.

Date (U.T.): April 4, 2004
Time (U.T.): 05:15
L1 190.2, L2 184.2. L3 119.3
Instrument: 9-inch (F/13.5) Maksutov-Cassegrain
Magnification: 258x
Filters: None
Seeing (1-10): 5, Antoniadi (I-V): III
Transparency (1-6): 4-5

Notes:
South Polar Region (SPR): Appears dusky to dull (4-5/10) an mottled.
South South South Temperate Zone (SSSTZ): Appears thin and shaded (6/10).
South South South Temperate Belt (SSSTB): Appears thin and dusky (4/10).
South South Temperate Zone (SSTZ): Appears thin and shaded (6/10).
South South Temperate Belt (SSTB): Appears slightly broad and dusky to dull 94-5/10).
South Temperate Zone (STZ): Appears bright (7/10) following the oval BE complex.
South Temperate Belt (STB): Appears dark (3/10) with the very bright (8/10) oval BE surrounded by a dark (3/10) collar towards the preceding limb.
South Tropical Zone (STrZ): Appears bright (7/10) without any other detail visible within it.
South Equatorial Belt (SEB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) with a thin, bright (7/10) rift (or zone) dividing it.
Equatorial Zone (EZ): Appears bright (7/10) with dull (5/10) streaks and very bright (8/10) ovals noted within it.
North Equatorial Belt (NEB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) with a complex of very bright (8/10) rifts preceding and following the CM. Very dark 92/10) festoon bases are noted along the southern border (NEBs).
North Tropical Zone (NTZ): Appears broad and bright (7/10) with a very bright (8/10) bay noted along the NEBs preceding the CM.
North Polar Region (NPR): Appears dusky to dull (4-5/10) with a thin, bright (7/10) rift noted within it.

The best of luck in your own observations and imaging of Jupiter.

Regards,
Carlos E. Hernandez

April 19, 2004 10:03 PM Forum: Solar System Observing

Jupiter Observation (April 20, 2004)

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I made an observation of Jupiter which shows delicate detail within the Equatorial Zone (EZ) and North Equatorial Belt (NEB). The seeing (6-7/10) cooperated for a short time before becoming worse. I welcome any comments on my observation.

Date (U.T.): April 20, 2004
Time (U.T.): 02:25
L1 093.4, L2 326.1, L3 265.5
Instrument: 9-inch (23-cm) F/13.5 Maksutov-Cassegrain
Magnification: 258x
Filters: None (IL)
Seeing (1-10): 6-7, Antoniadi (I-V): II-III
Transparency (1-6): 4-5

Notes:
South Polar Region (SPR): Appears dusky (4/10) and mottled.
South South Temperate Zone (SSTZ): Appears thin and bright (7/10).
South South Temperate Belt (SSTB): Appears thin and dusky (4/10).
South Temperate Zone (STZ): Appears bright (7/10) but no other detail noted within.
South Temperate Belt (STB): Appears dark (3/10) with two very bright (8/10) ovals noted within it adjacent to the CM.
South Tropical Zone (STrZ): Appears bright (7/10) with a thin, dull (5/10) band across it's center.
South Equatorial Belt (SEB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) with a thin, bright (7/10) zone (SEBZ) which appears to deviate towards the north following the CM. It's southern border (SEB-S) appears dark (3/10) and irregular.
Equatorial Zone (EZ): Appears bright (7/10) and it contains dull to dusky (4-5/10) condensations and projections when the seeing steadies.
North Equatorial Belt (NEB): Appears very complex with dull to dark (3-5/10) condensations and sections as well as bright (7/10) rifts and ovals. Very dark (2/10) festoon bases are noted along the southern border (NEB-S). Two dusky to dark (4-5/10) projections are noted along the northern border (NEB-N); the following one timed at 02:57 U.T. (L2 345.5. L3 284.9). A very bright (8/10) oval is noted between the NEB-N projections.
North Tropical Zone (NTrZ): Appears bright (7/10) with two dusky to dark (4-5/10) projections noted along the NEB-N.
North Polar Region (NPR): Appears dull to dusky (4-5/10) with bright (7/10) zones and a large, bright (7/10) circular feature preceding the CM.

The best of luck in your own observations and imaging of Jupiter.

Regards,
Carlos E. Hernandez

April 23, 2004 12:12 PM Forum: Solar System Observing

Jupiter Observation (April 22, 2004)

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I made a Jupiter observation under average to good seeing conditions (6-7/10). Much detail was noted especially between the SEB and NEB. I welcome any comments on my observation.

Date (U.T.): April 22, 2004
Time (U.T.): 04:45
L1 133.8, L2 350.6, L3 290.6
Instrument: 9-inch (23-cm) F/13.5 Maksutov-Cassegrain
Magnification: 258x and 388x
Filters: None (IL)
Seeing (1-10): 6-7, Antoniadi (I-V): II-III
Transparency (1-6): 4-5 (hazy)

Notes:
South Polar Region (SPR): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) and mottled.
South South South Temperate Zone (SSSTZ): Appears thin and bright (7/10).
South South South Temperate Belt (SSSTB): Appears thin and dull (5/10).
South South Temperate Zone (SSTZ): Appears thin and bright (7/10).
South South Temperate Belt (SSTB): Appears thin and dull (5/10).
South Temperate Zone (STZ): Appears thin and bright (7/10).
South Temperate Belt (STB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) and broad.
South Tropical Zone (STrZ): Appears bright (7/10) and it contains a thin, dull (5/10) band across it's center.
South Equatorial Belt (SEB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) with a thin, bright (7/10) zone across it's center (SEBZ).
Equatorial Zone (EZ): Appears shaded to bright (6-7/10) with dull (5/10) projections extending from NEB-S festoons. Very bright (8/10) ovals are noted over it's northern half between festoon bases.
North Equatorial Belt (NEB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) containing bright (7/10) rifts within. A dark (3/10), "hook-like" projection is noted along the northern border (NEB-N) preceding the CM containing a very bright (8/10) oval. Very dark (2/10) festoon bases are noted along the southern border (NEB-S). A bright rift appears to extend from the NEB-N into the center of the NEB following the CM.
North Tropical Zone (NTrZ): Appears bright (7/10) and broad, but no other detail visible within.
North North Temperate Belt (NNTB): Appears thin and dusky (4/10).
North North Temperate Zone (NNTZ): Appears thin and bright (7/10).
North North North Temperate Belt (NNNTB): Appears thin and dusky (4/10).
North Polar Region (NPR): Appears dark to dull (3-5/10) and mottled.

The best of luck to you on your own imaging and observation of Jupiter.

Regards,
Carlos E. Hernandez

April 27, 2004 10:44 AM Forum: Solar System Observing

Jupiter Observation (April 27, 2004)

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I made an observation under good seeing conditions (7-8/10). Much detail was noted across the jovian disk which made it difficult to record it completely. The North Equatorial Belt (NEB) was again noted to be very active as shown. I welcome any comments on my observation.

Date (U.T.): April 27, 2004
Time (U.T.): 04:10
L1 182.5, L2 001.3, L3 302.6
Instrument: 9-inch (23-cm) F/13.5 Maksutov-Cassegrain
Magnification: 258x and 388x
Filters: None (IL)
Seeing (1-10): 7-8, Antoniadi (I-V): II
Transparency (1-6): 6

Notes:
South Polar Region (SPR): Appears dark to dull (3-5/10) and mottled.
South South Temperate Zone (SSTZ): Appears bright (7/10) and thin.
South South Temperate Belt (SSTB): Appears dull (5/10) and thin.
South Temperate Zone (STZ): Appears bright (7/10) and broad.
South Temperate Belt (STB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) and broad. No ovals are noted within it at this time.
South Tropical Zone (STrZ): Appears bright (7/10) with a central dull (5/10), thin band.
South Equatorial Belt (SEB): Appears dark to dusky (3-4/10) with a thin, bright (7/10) and undulating zone (SEBZ) at it's center.
Equatorial Zone (EZ): Appears shaded to bright (6-7/10) with dusky to dull (4-5/10) condensations and projections within it.
North Equatorial Belt (NEB): Appears complex with dark to dull (3-5/10) sections containing bright (7/10) ovals and rifts within it. Very dark (2/10) festoon bases are noted along the southern border (NEB-S). Dark (3/10) projections are noted along the northern border (NEB-N; one is noted on the CM at L2 001.3 (L3 302.6).
North Tropical Zone (NTrZ): Appears bright (7/10) with very bright ovals noted along the NEB-N.
North North Temperate Belt (NNTB): Appears dusky (4/10) and broad.
North North Temperate Zone (NNTZ): Appears bright and thin.
North Polar Region (NPR): Appears dull to dark (3-5/10) and mottled.

The best of luck in your own observation and imaging of Jupiter.

Regards,
Carlos E. Hernandez

May 12, 2004 11:01 PM Forum: Solar System Observing

Comet Neat Q4

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I have put together a rendition of what Comet Neat Q4 appeared to me on May 12, 2004 at 01:25 U.T. (09:25 PM EDT). South is at the top and celestial east towards the right. The nucleus and coma were clearly visible with what appears to be the tail towards the north. A faint star was visible south and adjacent to the nucleus. The star to the right is GSC 803:470 (9.38 magnitude) and the one on the left is GSC 803:505 (10.62 magnitude). I hope that you like this impression of this interesting comet.

The best of luck in your own imaging and observations of this and other interesting comets.

Carlos

May 14, 2004 11:42 PM Forum: Solar System Observing

Comet Neat Q4 (May 15, 2004)

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I was able to observe Comet Neat Q4 again this evening through my Celestron 7x50mm binoculars and have recorded my impression of what I observed. The observation was made at 01:30 U.T. on May 15, 2004 (or 09:30 P.M. EDT on May 14, 2004). Comet Neat Q4 appeared as a brightly condensed "fuzzball" with what appeared to be a tail in the southwestern (SW) direction (I have enhanced the appearance of the tail slightly for descriptive purposes). The cluster M44 (Beehive) was visible 2 degrees 19 minutes 03 seconds from the comet at this time. The closest bright star to the comet, in a SE direction, was Theta Cancri (SAO 97881, 5.3m). I estimated the length of the tail to be nearly 3 degrees (as this is the angular distance between the comet and Delta Cancri (SAO 98087, 3.94m) towards the SW). Tomorrow night (May 15, 2004) the comet will be approximately 1.5 degrees from M44. That will be a spectacular sight! I hope that you enjoy my observation.

The best of luck in your own imaging and observations of this comet.

Carlos

May 25, 2004 10:13 PM Forum: Solar System Observing

Comet Linear T7

Posted By Carlos E. Hernandez

I made an observation tonight (01:00 U.T. or 09:00 PM EDT) of Comet Linear T7 (C/2002 T7) while located approximately 17 degrees above my southwestern (SW) horizon in the constellation of Puppis. The comet appeared as an approximately 3rd magnitude "fuzzball" in my 7 x 50 binoculars. The stars recorded in the field (in a clockwise direction) are SAO153520 (5.69m), SAO153500 (5.16m), SAO153372 (5.03m), SAO153363 (6.06m), SAO 153409 (6.38m)/SAO153404 (6.31m), SAO153454 (5.17m), and SAO153687 (4.61m). I was unable to detect a tail (possibly due to the haze close to the horizon) at this time. I hope that you enjoy my observation. I welcome any comments on it.

The best of luck in your own imaging and observing comets in the heavens.

Regards,
Carlos E. Hernandez