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Posts Made By: Rod Mollise

December 19, 2011 04:05 PM Forum: Meade

Re: Corrector plate

Posted By Rod Mollise

Make sure it is wearing off. It is almost unheard of for a _properly applied_ lens coating to wear off. Give the thing a good cleaning with (original blue) Windex and see if it's not just some kind of scum.

Whatever it is, the effect on images will be minimal.

January 8, 2012 08:22 AM Forum: After Dark

Re: Do people do astronomy with annoying friends?

Posted By Rod Mollise

I've found a few fellow club members annoying. But they probably found me annoying too.

Real nutcases? In over 40 years of belonging to clubs, I can think of exactly two people who really made me WONDER. lol.

Generally speaking amateur astronomers are the nicest, kindest, smartest people it's ever been my good fortune to be associated with.

May 6, 2012 04:15 PM Forum: Meade

Re: Double image

Posted By Rod Mollise

Impossible to say without knowing more. Does this look like a reflection? Do the images converge if you move the scope to precisely center the object? Condition of the secondary mirror?

August 12, 2013 06:53 AM Forum: Beginning Astronomy?

Re: The good and the bad

Posted By Rod Mollise

billy moss said:

Hi
To someone getting started, sometimes remarks made about some scopes may cause a person to pass up on a very good, low price scope. There is one scope that I believe gets more bad reviews than it deserves, because you do get bad ones, but when you do get a good one, it is more likely to be a better scope than the ones it is compared to. The B&L 4000 SCT gets bad reviews, but I really think that the maybe 100 of them that were bad, have been sold and resold back and forth, that is where most of the bad reviews come from. But the mechanical construction of these scopes are great, and the drives are great. There are more good ones than bad ones. If you can find one that has the quality optics, than you have a better scope that will last a lifetime. You can get these scopes rather cheap, because of the bad reputations caused by the bad ones. I do not how to really go about finding the good ones through the ads, but if you could, it would be well worth it. Mine is a quality scope, very well made, it is a shame that all of them did not have the same optical quality, do not understand how this happens, unless the quality assurance was just not what it should have been.
Billy

These little scopes are not all "bad," but few--if any of them--are better than mediocre. I've seen a lot of them over the last four decades, and I have yet to find a truly good one. wink

Pretty little scopes, but unless one can be had for a steal...

September 30, 2014 04:48 AM Forum: Refractors

Re: 102 vs 102 ED

Posted By Rod Mollise

billy moss said:

I have a vintage vixen/celestron black tube C102, made in Japan. It is mint. The optics are excellent, the FL is 9.8. The images are very sharp and clear. Has anyone compared these vintage scopes to the 102 ED models sold by skywatcher, orion, and vixen, with the shorter FL of 8.8. What difference would there be, it seems that the 102 may be sharper than the ED, since it has a longer FL. I have never compared them, would there be any better image quality in the ED.
Billy

No, it's no sharper; the opposite is true. The difference is that the color is less in the ED, and generally images just look a littler better. Not that the C102 doesn't do a nice job. I have one of the later models, a Synta made one, that throws up a near perfect star test, and I really love the scope. An ED, however? No. The ED will display slightly better contrast, and high power images will just be much better.

November 13, 2002 06:25 AM Forum: Equipment Talk

What's a Celestron Ultima 8 worth?

Posted By Rod Mollise

Hi:

If the scope's in good shape, yes, that is a fantastic deal. Frankly, It'd take at least twice that to get me to part with mine (a 1995 model)! We won't see its like again. Keep in mind, though, that not all Ultima 8s are the same. The early ones had a rechargeable lead-acid battery that wasn't that great (it's less helpful to have a rechageable battery than you would think...if the battery goes dead during an observing run, it's better to just be able to chuck it and replace it with a fresh one than have to recharge). Some of the early ones did not have PEC, either. And earlier ones also had a wedge that was a little light for this heavy-forked scope...I think it was about 1994 before Celestron switched to a C11 wedge for this big 8.


Peace,
Rod Mollise

January 17, 2003 08:11 AM Forum: Equipment Talk

SC collimation

Posted By Rod Mollise

Hi:

NO. Using a sight tube or other newtonian style collimatin device on an SCT is a recipe for miscollimation. There are two ways to do it: get a laser designed for an SCT (ala' Kendrick's) or collimate using the diffraction rings of a slightly out of focus star. There are a couple of "collimation eyepieces" designed to help you determine whether the rings are concentric, but they are not necessary. Keep in mind, too, that the lasers require you to do a "manual" collimation on a star, real or artificial first, before you can use them.

Peace,
Rod

January 18, 2003 10:05 AM Forum: Equipment Talk

Perfect City Scope?

Posted By Rod Mollise

Hi:

Keep in mind that aperture is critically important if you live where light pollution is really nasty. In "sodium pink" sky conditions, I do not recommend anything smaller than about 8 inches. In addition to making deepsky objects look much better in the skyglow, a 8 will deliver more detail and brightness than a 4 inch refractor or small MCT on the Moon and planets. And be considerably cheaper to boot. Depending on the size of your balcony, you might find an 8 inch dob does the trick. The Orion XTs can be moved in one piece, so when you're ready to take the scope downstairs you'll find it fairly easy. While I'm not a huge dob fan, I think this is the best choice for your situation.

Peace,
Rod

February 3, 2003 07:18 AM Forum: Equipment Talk

"Normal" focus shift in a Cassegrain

Posted By Rod Mollise

Hi:

Most current SCTs are pretty good in this regard, especially the 8s. What I see these days averages out to about 45" or less, which I consider quite acceptable. Shift of this magnitude won't usually put the image off the chip of even a fairly small CCD sensor.

Peace,
Rod Mollise

May 27, 2003 03:31 PM Forum: Equipment Talk

Re: Most Aesthestically Pleasing Scope On Earth?

Posted By Rod Mollise

That's easy. 70s Orange Tube C8...the sandcast forks and pebbly finish tube...mmmmm... ;-)