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Posts Made By: Kimball Corson

February 24, 2003 12:47 PM Forum: Chinese Optics Imports

Burgess 25x100 vs Burgess 20x80

Posted By Kimball Corson

Hi Group,

What are your thoughts on a purchase decision in choosing between these two binoculars, the price difference aside?

Kimball Corson

March 9, 2003 07:33 AM Forum: Equipment Talk

Mount for Burgess 25X x100mm Binocular

Posted By Kimball Corson

Anyone know about a good, sturdy and reasonably priced binocular mount (new or used) that would work well on these 9.2 pound babies? I already have a strong sturdy tripod. Of the manufacturers I find on line, their mounts are either too pricey and overkill, or too frumpy, or inadequate for the weight. Thanks.

Kimball Corson

March 9, 2003 07:36 AM Forum: Astro Binoculars

Mount for Burgess 25X x 100mm Binoculars

Posted By Kimball Corson

Anyone know of a good, sturdy and reasonably priced binocular mount (new or used) that would work well on these 9.2 pound babies? I already have a strong sturdy tripod. Most mounts I find on line are either too pricey and overkill, or too frumpy or just inadequate for the weight. Thanks.

Kimball Corson

March 21, 2003 04:37 PM Forum: Astro Binoculars

Burgess 25x100 vs. Burgess 20x80

Posted By Kimball Corson

Thanks to the comments of Eric D and EdZ
elsewhere, I made the choice between the Burgess
25x100 and the Burgess 20x80 binoculars snd
purchased the Burgess 25x100. I have been very
pleased with the 25x100 . . . so pleased in fact
I just ordered the Burgess 20x80 as well,
largely as fill-in between the Burgess 25x100
and my Swarovski 15x56 WB. At $149, how big a
mistake can I make? I will report more on
both as I can and learn more.

Kimball Corson



March 21, 2003 04:38 PM Forum: Chinese Optics Imports

Burgess 25x100 vs. Burgess 20x80

Posted By Kimball Corson

Thanks to the comments of Eric D and EdZ
elsewhere, I made the choice between the Burgess
25x100 and the Burgess 20x80 binoculars snd
purchased the Burgess 25x100. I have been very
pleased with the 25x100 . . . so pleased in fact
I just ordered the Burgess 20x80 as well,
largely as fill-in between the Burgess 25x100
and my Swarovski 15x56 WB. At $149, how big a
mistake can I make? I will report more on
both as I can and learn more.

Kimball Corson



March 25, 2003 07:17 AM Forum: Astro Binoculars

A Deal at Hand

Posted By Kimball Corson

Astronomy magazine is offering two free
issues (April and May of 2003, if you
act now) on line, as an inducement to
try their magazine. The two months
involved just happen to include Phil
Harrington's two bino articles. That
is a deal that is hard to say no to.

Kimball Corson



March 29, 2003 07:46 PM Forum: Astro Binoculars

A Newly Designed Chinese 9x63 Bino

Posted By Kimball Corson

My wife broke her sunglasses frames
yesterday so we dingied over to Point
Loma in San Diego, found the optical
shop where she had bought them sometime
back, and did my eyes pop open on going
in the store. This guy picked up a new
line and now also carries virtually every
Chinese binocular made, or so it seemed,
including three or four versions of the
25X/40x100s, with tripods. Although her
frames cost me $275 to get the same ones,
I did manage to make the trip worthwhile
and picked up an Oriental Industries Co.,
Ltd. newly designed 9x63 for $145 which
is really very, very good optically. Even
the diopter adjustment is properly
calibrated and zeroed. I was shocked at
the bang per buck. Last night I tried them
out astronomically and was underwhelmed,
largely because the magnification is too
low for my preference. But terrestially
and around and across San Diego Bay, the
binocular is stunning. Highly recommended
and sold under the Soleado Brand, which I
had never heard of. These puppies are
pretty big (est. = 12" high), but not
particularly heavy. They can be easily
hand-held for extended viewing. The central
focusing is very, very smmoth. Contrast is
stunning. Also, it is optically very, very
sharp, all the way to the very edge. FOV
could be a tad larger (5.4 degrees), but who
is complaining. The binocular has the same
shape/configutration as the Zeiss 10x40 BT*P.

I'm binocularly incorrigable, but at least
I know it. Using binoculars is like taking
photographs but without having to develop
the film and then fuss with the pictures,
. . . at least for me.

Kimball Corson


April 3, 2003 09:36 PM Forum: Equipment Talk

You Don't Know What You Are Missing

Posted By Kimball Corson


I dabbled too long in just telescopes before learning about and getting my first pair of big binoculars, a Burgess 25x100. (Little binoculars don't count, because they don't offer a comparable experience.) My 25x100 binocular was an eye opener, and an astronomical experience I believe I should have had much earlier, as an amateur astronomer. For once, I really saw the porthole into space Televue touts, but I never saw through my scopes and Naglers. Even then, however, I only bit on a big binocular because such big Chinese binoculars seemed to be so well built and perform so well, optically and mechanically, for what is really just a pittance. The low cost of Chinese labor makes these big binoculars almost a gift to Americans. Too many telescope aficionados are missing out on too much that can be for too little. Also, big binoculars are a much better way to learn the night sky for those just getting started and for intermediate astronomers as well. A high quality dob with a Zambuto mirror, such as a Portaball or the like, and the Oberwerk or Burgess 25x100 is all an amateur astronomer really needs in the normal course. Getting a light weight Oberwerk or Burgess 20x80 on a Bogen 3011 with a 3126 video head as well simply guilds the Lilly with great portability and adds grab n go facility, but with some compromise of images, of course.

The customized big Chinese binoculars offered by Bill Burgess of Burgess Optical (www.burgessoptical.com) and Kevin Busarow of BigBinoculars (www.bigbinoculars.com) are something ever reasonable amateur astronomer should look into. For the price of a used TeleVue Pronto (tube only), you can get a Burgess or Oberwerk 25x100, find a Bogen 3046 tripod, and get a suitable mount (T+T, Universal Astronomics or a Bogen 501 video head) and be so far ahead on the fun curve, it is unbelievable. The TV 101, Pronto and TV-85 I have owned never provided me with a comparable or as interesting an experience. I still have the TV-85, but its use is getting squeezed out by the big binoculars and my Portaball 8, and it is gathering dust.

My notion is you have to become an aficionado of the cheap big binoculars before you are ready to bite the financial bullet on the big expensive ones. Many more people need to get their feet wet in this quarter The cheaper Chinese big binoculars will satisfy most, but a few will eventually go for the better stuff, when and if they can. However, the cheap Chinese stuff is really of very decent quality, both optically and mechanically, and a wholloping bang per buck, something the field of astronomy sorely needs. So heads up, folks. If you don't know about these big binocular opportunities, you are really missing out on something terrific and fun. Forget your 10x42s. They are not even in the ball park. Try the big binoculars I describe. You won't regret it.



Kimball Corson

April 3, 2003 09:38 PM Forum: Astro Binoculars

It is Worth Having Big Binoculars

Posted By Kimball Corson


I dabbled too long in just telescopes before learning about and getting my first pair of big binoculars, a Burgess 25x100. (Little binoculars don't count, because they don't offer a comparable experience.) My 25x100 binocular was an eye opener, and an astronomical experience I believe I should have had much earlier, as an amateur astronomer. For once, I really saw the porthole into space Televue touts, but I never saw through my scopes and Naglers. Even then, however, I only bit on a big binocular because such big Chinese binoculars seemed to be so well built and perform so well, optically and mechanically, for what is really just a pittance. The low cost of Chinese labor makes these big binoculars almost a gift to Americans. Too many telescope aficionados are missing out on too much that can be for too little. Also, big binoculars are a much better way to learn the night sky for those just getting started and for intermediate astronomers as well. A high quality dob with a Zambuto mirror, such as a Portaball or the like, and the Oberwerk or Burgess 25x100 is all an amateur astronomer really needs in the normal course. Getting a light weight Oberwerk or Burgess 20x80 on a Bogen 3011 with a 3126 video head as well simply guilds the Lilly with great portability and adds grab n go facility, but with some compromise of images, of course.

The customized big Chinese binoculars offered by Bill Burgess of Burgess Optical (www.burgessoptical.com) and Kevin Busarow of BigBinoculars (www.bigbinoculars.com) are something ever reasonable amateur astronomer should look into. For the price of a used TeleVue Pronto (tube only), you can get a Burgess or Oberwerk 25x100, find a Bogen 3046 tripod, and get a suitable mount (T+T, Universal Astronomics or a Bogen 501 video head) and be so far ahead on the fun curve, it is unbelievable. The TV 101, Pronto and TV-85 I have owned never provided me with a comparable or as interesting an experience. I still have the TV-85, but its use is getting squeezed out by the big binoculars and my Portaball 8, and it is gathering dust.

My notion is you have to become an aficionado of the cheap big binoculars before you are ready to bite the financial bullet on the big expensive ones. Many more people need to get their feet wet in this quarter The cheaper Chinese big binoculars will satisfy most, but a few will eventually go for the better stuff, when and if they can. However, the cheap Chinese stuff is really of very decent quality, both optically and mechanically, and a wholloping bang per buck, something the field of astronomy sorely needs. So heads up, folks. If you don't know about these big binocular opportunities, you are really missing out on something terrific and fun. Forget your 10x42s. They are not even in the ball park. Try the big binoculars I describe. You won't regret it.



Kimball Corson

April 3, 2003 09:40 PM Forum: TeleVue

You Don't Know What You Are Missing

Posted By Kimball Corson


I dabbled too long in just telescopes before learning about and getting my first pair of big binoculars, a Burgess 25x100. (Little binoculars don't count, because they don't offer a comparable experience.) My 25x100 binocular was an eye opener, and an astronomical experience I believe I should have had much earlier, as an amateur astronomer. For once, I really saw the porthole into space Televue touts, but I never saw through my scopes and Naglers. Even then, however, I only bit on a big binocular because such big Chinese binoculars seemed to be so well built and perform so well, optically and mechanically, for what is really just a pittance. The low cost of Chinese labor makes these big binoculars almost a gift to Americans. Too many telescope aficionados are missing out on too much that can be for too little. Also, big binoculars are a much better way to learn the night sky for those just getting started and for intermediate astronomers as well. A high quality dob with a Zambuto mirror, such as a Portaball or the like, and the Oberwerk or Burgess 25x100 is all an amateur astronomer really needs in the normal course. Getting a light weight Oberwerk or Burgess 20x80 on a Bogen 3011 with a 3126 video head as well simply guilds the Lilly with great portability and adds grab n go facility, but with some compromise of images, of course.

The customized big Chinese binoculars offered by Bill Burgess of Burgess Optical (www.burgessoptical.com) and Kevin Busarow of BigBinoculars (www.bigbinoculars.com) are something ever reasonable amateur astronomer should look into. For the price of a used TeleVue Pronto (tube only), you can get a Burgess or Oberwerk 25x100, find a Bogen 3046 tripod, and get a suitable mount (T+T, Universal Astronomics or a Bogen 501 video head) and be so far ahead on the fun curve, it is unbelievable. The TV 101, Pronto and TV-85 I have owned never provided me with a comparable or as interesting an experience. I still have the TV-85, but its use is getting squeezed out by the big binoculars and my Portaball 8, and it is gathering dust.

My notion is you have to become an aficionado of the cheap big binoculars before you are ready to bite the financial bullet on the big expensive ones. Many more people need to get their feet wet in this quarter The cheaper Chinese big binoculars will satisfy most, but a few will eventually go for the better stuff, when and if they can. However, the cheap Chinese stuff is really of very decent quality, both optically and mechanically, and a wholloping bang per buck, something the field of astronomy sorely needs. So heads up, folks. If you don't know about these big binocular opportunities, you are really missing out on something terrific and fun. Forget your 10x42s. They are not even in the ball park. Try the big binoculars I describe. You won't regret it.



Kimball Corson