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Posts Made By: Ron Bee

May 29, 2002 03:20 PM Forum: Deep Sky Observing

Colorful stars in globulars?

Posted By Ron Bee

Well, I've seen a few globular clusters now (many Messier and some NGC ones). But I've never seen colorful stars (eg. yellow, orange, red or deep red) in the stars that I can resolved through my 4" refractor. Perhaps some stars in GC I've seen looked light blue. In constrast, there are *very* colorful stars in some of the open clusters

Are there colorful stars in some globulars? If so, does anyone have a list of this colorful gobulars? Or perhaps only large aperture can see colorful gobulars? If not, can someone explain why are there no colorful stars in globulars?

Thanks,
Ron B[ee]

May 30, 2002 12:17 AM Forum: Deep Sky Observing

Light Cup speed limit - first light

Posted By Ron Bee

http://members.cox.net/ronby/Observations/Light_Cup_Speed_Limit_1.htm

Enjoy,
Ron B[ee]

May 30, 2002 12:17 AM Forum: Equipment Talk

Light Cup speed limit - first light

Posted By Ron Bee

http://members.cox.net/ronby/Observations/Light_Cup_Speed_Limit_1.htm

Enjoy,
Ron B[ee]

May 31, 2002 04:58 PM Forum: Deep Sky Observing

Supernova discovery with 100mm aperture?

Posted By Ron Bee

Well, I must admit that last year and this year, when I saw the annoucement of discoveries of supernova, I got all excited. Then, I noted something like "it has brightened to magnitude 13" something. Brighten ;-)? Thus, I've simply been ignored super nova discoveries.

Well, I've been catching up on reading S&T and stumbled across the March 2002 article entitle "Nova Hunters" by none other than one of my most favorite author, O'Meara ;-). I was shocked to find out that Pereira had discovered quite a few nova through his 14 x 100 binos. Why, that's very darn close to 102mm aperture of my TV-102! Wow! I
used to think that such dim stellar explosion can only be discovered by someone standing on a ladder of a huge light bucket or something similar.

I was convinced that the whole heavenly sky has been plowed clean and that there is **not a single** stellar "bread crump" left for the small dingy scope (such as 4" refractor) to discover in the 21st century! Talking about being born way too late, I thought. Was I irrevocably wrong? Are there other examples?

Ron B[ee]

June 2, 2002 08:59 AM Forum: Deep Sky Observing

Bye to galaxies and meowed to nebula

Posted By Ron Bee

http://members.cox.net/ronby/Observations/060102.htm

Enjoy,
Ron B[ee]

June 4, 2002 12:39 PM Forum: Deep Sky Observing

TV-102 jabbed at RASC Deep Sky Challenge Object

Posted By Ron Bee

As the 10.2cm TV-102 Light Cup was turning it refractive lens north-ward one night, it caught a white glove thrown from Canada right in the eyepiece ;-) coming from the list known as "RASC Deep Sky Challenge Object" (by Alan Dyer and Alister Ling - a great list BTW).
http://www.edmontonrasc.com/deepsky.html
Since it has been meaning to equalize the balance of aperture in Libra (which means balance or scale), why not! The LM was 5.7 last night.

The first duel is NGC 5987, a mag 8.6 globular in Libra. It was easily caught by the TV-102 at 22x as dim round smudge. 30x didn’t give much improvement. Much better at 73x (12mm Radian), much darker sky background, still dim, with a nebulous glow using averted vision. A few stars seen with averted vision in and around the core at 110x.
Too dim at 176x (5mm Radian), but the GC can be seen as occupying 1/3 of the FOV. The Light Cup showed a grin through the eyepiece as I whispered that the minimum aperture stated by RASC is 15cm ;-). The GC looks dimmer than mag 8.6.

Next object was not the RASC list, but might as well bag it too, a mag 11.2 elliptical galaxy, NGC 5812. Looked like a star that popped in and out at 22x through the TV-102 between the mag 10.3 star GSC 5012:45 and mag 10.4 star GSC 5579:923. 73x gave a very nice dark background but the galaxy still popped in and out as a very tiny round glow, forming a line with the above two stars and the mag 9.7
star GSC 5579:921. At 110x, it is slightly dimmer than mag 12.3 star GSC 5012:69 but brighter than the two mag 13.2 stars GSC 5012:27 and GSC 5012:41 which form a neat tiny triangle with the star GSC 5012:45. Tiny nebulosity surrounding a stellar core can now be seen. Too dim at 176x but the stellar core and glow can still be seen.

Another 15cm minimum aperture? Umm, can you see a trend of record breaking here ;-)...?

As a good scribe for the Light Cup, I anxiously checked my database later and found the following RASC Challenge Objects already broken down by the 4" TV-102 Light Cup:
NGC 2419 - stated minimum aperture: 15cm
NGC 4236 - stated minimum aperture: 20cm (Wee, Wow!)
NGC 5053 - stated minimum aperture: 10cm - checked

So, I recommend anyone with a small telescope to give this tough list a worthy right jab ;-).

Ron B[ee]

June 5, 2002 10:39 AM Forum: Deep Sky Observing

Open cluster in Corona Borealis!

Posted By Ron Bee

What? Open cluster in Coronae Borealis? No can be, you say!

When I first looked at Corona Borealis, there wasn't a single DSO reachable through a small telescope! What makes it so sad is that the star formation of this constellation is so pretty and conspicuous. So beautiful but yet so barren! (Of course, with a very large light bucket, many dimmy galaxies are abound.)

So while panning around with my 40mm Pentax XL at 3 degree FOV, the Light Cup stumbled upon an undiscovered(?) open
"cluster". Try it. Star hop from Delta Coronae Borealis to Epsilon Coronae Borealis. Draw a line between Upsilon Coronae Borealis and Delta Coronae Borealis and continue southeast of this line to the mag 6.6 star SAO 84223. Finally, center your eyepiece at the mag 6.5 star SAO 84247. You're now at the center of the "LC-1" i.e., "Light Cup 1") open cluster. I counted about 25 uniformly white stars and many more dim stars. You'll need at 3 degree FOV to appreciate it.

So where can the Light Cup apply for a new catalog for LC-1 ;-)? Ok, so if these group of stars can't be considered an open cluster, well why not 'cause they sure look like they form a "cluster"?

Ron B[ee]
PS I've seen worse open clusters in the NGC Catalog!

June 7, 2002 09:26 AM Forum: Deep Sky Observing

TV-102 interviewed actor & actress

Posted By Ron Bee

http://members.cox.net/ronby/Observations/060602.htm

Enjoy,
Ron B[ee]

June 10, 2002 10:00 AM Forum: Equipment Talk

Lowell, Venus, and aperture

Posted By Ron Bee

I was reading the current issue of S&T how Lowell had discovered the spokes of Venus. I stumbled across the info that he found that Venus was "too bright and badly shattered by air currents" in the new 24" Clark refractor. So he stopped down the aperture (using the iris). He found the spokes was best seen with aperture between 1.6" to 3"!
Wow, I gave up too easily on Venus, thinking these features would need excellent seeing and large aperture :-(. I now wonder if Lowell were to continue to use full aperture, he may never have discovered the spokes!

I've read about other instance at another observatory where the aperture must be reduced (in this case to 4") to get a good view of Mars. But I've also read here and on SAA that full aperture can see more in *bad* seeing! So these two observation approaches seems contradictory. Also, if reduced aperture isn't helpful, why do these observatory class telescopes have built-in iris?

Can anyone/everyone shine some more light into aperture ;-)?

Thanks,
Ron B[ee]

June 10, 2002 10:00 AM Forum: Deep Sky Observing

Lowell, Venus, and aperture

Posted By Ron Bee

I was reading the current issue of S&T how Lowell had discovered the spokes of Venus. I stumbled across the info that he found that Venus was "too bright and badly shattered by air currents" in the new 24" Clark refractor. So he stopped down the aperture (using the iris). He found the spokes was best seen with aperture between 1.6" to 3"!
Wow, I gave up too easily on Venus, thinking these features would need excellent seeing and large aperture :-(. I now wonder if Lowell were to continue to use full aperture, he may never have discovered the spokes!

I've read about other instance at another observatory where the aperture must be reduced (in this case to 4") to get a good view of Mars. But I've also read here and on SAA that full aperture can see more in *bad* seeing! So these two observation approaches seems contradictory. Also, if reduced aperture isn't helpful, why do these observatory class telescopes have built-in iris?

Can anyone/everyone shine some more light into aperture ;-)?

Thanks,
Ron B[ee]