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New PST and Nagler Advice

Started by SocalDarkSkies, 10/25/2006 02:52PM
Posted 10/25/2006 02:52PM Opening Post
I just spent my first two hours out with a new PST and am very impressed.

I need some advice however as I found that I did not have enough in-focus for my Nagler 5mm T6 and Radian 3mm. My BO 4mm Planetary, Meade 4k 8.8 UWA and a 3x barlow/15mm Plossl combination all focused without a problem.

Should Nagler Type 6 and Radian eyepieces be able to focus in this device or am I stuck using other eyepieces? I sure hope they work as I have been on a rampage replacing my old eyepieces and planned on adding 7 and 11mm T6's to my collection soon. Is there an adjustment I am missing or should know about that would give me a few more "right" turns on the focuser knob?

On another note, I noticed that the image through a Meade 4K 6.4mm Plossl simply kicked butt on the more complex BO and 8.8 UWA. Do simpler eyepieces work best?

Any insight is appreciated!

Jerry

p.s. My first feeble attempt at imaging through this nifty scope is attached.

Attached Image:

SocalDarkSkies's attachment for post 34144
Posted 10/26/2006 11:30AM #1
Jerry:

I'll have to defer the Nagler focusing advice to those who own them. In general the PST has limited focus range so there are eyepiece that will not work. Yes, simple eyepiece designs do seem to work the best in h-alpha scopes. I'm sure that's why Coronado chose a plossl design for their CeMax line. I've had very good results from using plossls - even cheap generic ones work well. Note though, that there are people using the newer Naglers in the larger solar scopes/filters who love them. It all boils down to the coatings on an eyepiece as well as the glass types used. Some are more efficient in red light than others.

The PST is a wonderful little machine! Enjoy.

Tom

Clear, sunny skies.
Tom Masterson
Coronado-Lunt-Daystar Solar Filters forum Moderator