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Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of January 2020

Posted by Guy Pirro 01/03/2020 08:24PM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of January 2020

Happy New Year and welcome to the night sky report for January 2020 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. The winter sky is filled with brilliant stars. In January, the northern hemisphere features beautiful views of Capella - a pair of giant yellow stars, Aldebaran - a red giant star, two star clusters - the Hyades (Caldwell 41) and the Pleiades (M45), and the Crab Nebula (M1). The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.

Astronomers Spot Three Supermassive Black Holes On a Collision Course

Posted by Guy Pirro 12/18/2019 05:14AM

Astronomers Spot Three Supermassive Black Holes On a Collision Course

Astronomers have spotted three giant black holes within a titanic collision of three galaxies. The unusual system was captured by several observatories, including three NASA space telescopes. It should be noted that five billion years from now, our Milky Way galaxy will collide with the Andromeda galaxy. As is the case with these three galaxies, this will mark a moment of both destruction and creation. The galaxies will lose their separate identities as they merge into one. At the same time, cosmic clouds of gas and dust will smash together, triggering the birth of new stars. Most of the hundreds of billions of stars in each of the galaxies will never actually collide, but will pass rather freely between each other with little damage. This however, will not be the case for the interstellar matter consisting largely of clouds of debris, dust, and gas. The high relative velocities and pressures between the interacting interstellar clouds will pull, twist, and distort the individual galaxies and trigger a firestorm of star formation.

Parker Solar Probe Reveals Surprising Details About Our Sun

Posted by Guy Pirro 12/12/2019 02:48AM

Parker Solar Probe Reveals Surprising Details About Our Sun

The Sun is revealing itself in dramatic detail and shedding light on how other stars may form and behave throughout the universe, all thanks to NASA's Parker Solar Probe. The spacecraft is enduring scorching temperatures to gather data, which is being shared for the first time in new studies that illuminate previously unknown and only theorized characteristics of our volatile celestial neighbor. The information Parker has uncovered about how the Sun constantly ejects material and energy will help scientists rewrite the models they use to understand and predict the space weather around our planet, and understand the process by which stars are created and evolve. During its initial flybys, Parker studied the Sun from a distance of about 15 million miles. That is already closer to the Sun than Mercury. But the spacecraft will get even closer in the future, as it travels at more than 213,000 mph -- faster than any previous spacecraft.

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of December 2019

Posted by Guy Pirro 12/01/2019 06:17PM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of December 2019

Welcome to the night sky report for December 2019 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. Step outside on a cold December night when the stars shine bright to find the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, and Cepheus. They will help you locate Eta Cassiopeiae (a binary star system), M103 (a fan-shaped open star cluster of about 170 stars), and Mu Cephei (a red giant variable star known as the Garnet Star). Also, look for beautiful pairings of Venus, Saturn, Mars, and the crescent Moon throughout the month, at sunrise and sunset. The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.

NASA Space Telescopes Capture the Biggest, Baddest Gamma Ray Blast Ever Seen

Posted by Guy Pirro 11/22/2019 05:03AM

NASA Space Telescopes Capture the Biggest, Baddest Gamma Ray Blast Ever Seen

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) were discovered by American surveillance satellites in the late 1960s. These satellites were looking for gamma rays coming from possible clandestine Soviet nuclear tests. Instead these satellites found brief but intense flashes of gamma rays coming from random directions in space. To this day GRBs remain one of the greatest mysteries of modern astronomy. Despite lasting only a few milliseconds to several minutes, they are the most energetic phenomena known. An individual GRB can release in a matter of seconds the same amount of energy that our Sun will radiate over its 10 billion year lifetime. These beams blast out of imploding stars at over 99 percent the speed of light. They carry most of their energy in the form of gamma rays -- a lethal form of radiation that can penetrate bone and tear apart living cells. If our planet got caught in a nearby Gamma Ray Burst, the atmosphere would be largely stripped away. The current record for a super powerful GRB has just occurred, and it goes to a January 2019 outburst. The eruption came from a galaxy located so far away that the explosion actually happened 5 billion years ago. When the radiation finally arrived at Earth, it was seen by our satellite sentries that monitor the sky for such fireworks, including NASA’s Swift and Fermi telescopes, in addition to the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes on the Canary Islands. Hubble can't detect gamma rays, but its sharp vision was used to see where the burst came from. Hubble found that the host galaxy of the GRB is actually one of a pair of colliding galaxies.

The Periodic Table of the Elements Turns 150 this Year

Posted by Guy Pirro 11/15/2019 03:52AM

The Periodic Table of the Elements Turns 150 this Year

Largely unnoticed in the corners of countless classrooms around the world hangs the singular achievement of a Siberian-born scientist and the founding document of modern chemistry -- the periodic table of the elements, which turns 150 this year. While writing his textbook, Principles of Chemistry, Dmitri Mendeleev sought a logical way to organize all of the elements known to science at the time. Like many before him, Mendeleev noticed that certain elements resembled one another in their chemical properties. By ordering the elements by increasing atomic weight, he spotted a periodic repetition in these common properties and he published his periodic law and table-like list of elements in 1869. The periodic law allowed Mendeleev to predict the existence and properties of undiscovered elements that would ultimately fill the gaps in his table. Eventually, the discovery of protons and electrons changed the table in a subtle but important way. Mendeleev originally ordered his table by atomic weight, but the periodic table is now ordered by atomic number, which refers to the number of protons in the nucleus of an atom. The protons, in turn, define the number of electrons, located outside the nucleus, which control the properties that so regularly repeat within each column in the table.

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of November 2019

Posted by Guy Pirro 11/04/2019 06:02PM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of November 2019

Welcome to the night sky report for November 2019 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. In November, hunt for the fainter constellations of fall, including Pisces, Aries, and Triangulum. They will guide you to find several galaxies, including the spiral galaxy M74 and M33 (the Triangulum Galaxy). On November 11 we're in for a rare treat, as the innermost planet, Mercury, passes directly in front of the Sun for a few hours. The event will last about five and a half hours, during which Mercury's path will take it right across the middle of the Sun's disk. The next Mercury transit that will be visible from North America isn't until 2049. (Warning: You should never look directly at the Sun without proper protection, as it can permanently damage your eyes). The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.

Was Venus Once Habitable?

Posted by Guy Pirro 10/24/2019 08:23PM

Was Venus Once Habitable?

Venus may have had a stable climate for billions of years. Now, a new study is uncovering the possibility that a global resurfacing event, probably linked to volcanic activity, may have transformed the planet from an Earth-like climate to the 462 degree hot-house that we see today. Earth and Venus seem completely different. Earth is a lush, clement world teeming with life, while Venus is hellish, with its surface roasting at temperatures higher than those of a kitchen oven. But underneath it all the two planets share a number of striking similarities. They are nearly identical in size. The basic composition of Venus and Earth is very similar. One difference stands out, however -- Venus has very little water. Were the contents of Earth's oceans to be spread evenly across our world, they would create a layer 3 km deep. If you were to condense the water vapor in Venus' atmosphere onto its surface, it would create a global puddle just 3 cm deep. Something catastrophic happened on Venus and what caused this is still a mystery.

30 Years Ago -- Voyager 2's Historic Neptune Flyby

Posted by Guy Pirro 10/19/2019 01:59AM

30 Years Ago -- Voyager 2's Historic Neptune Flyby

Thirty years ago, on August 25, 1989, NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft made a close flyby of Neptune, giving humanity its first close-up look at our Solar System's eighth planet and marking the end of the Voyager mission's Grand Tour of the Solar System's four giant planets - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. But that historic first was also a last -- No other spacecraft has visited Neptune since. Voyager 2 launched on August 20, 1977, about two weeks before its twin spacecraft, Voyager 1. The two spacecraft are today the most distant human-made objects, having recently passed through the Heliosphere – a giant bubble that surrounds the Solar System. The original goal of the two Voyager spacecraft was to just explore Jupiter and Saturn. However, as part of a mission extension, Voyager 2 also flew by Uranus in 1986 and Neptune in 1989, taking advantage of a once in a 176 year alignment of the planets that enabled it to take a grand tour of the outer planets. Today, Voyager 2 is about 18.2 billion kilometers, or 11.3 billion miles, from Earth. Voyager 1 is about 22.0 billion kilometers (13.7 billion miles) away from Earth. Judging by their unmatched track record, it seems likely that Voyager 2 and its twin, Voyager 1, will continue to be humanity's eyes and ears into the realm of the stars for years to come. As the Space Age hits the 62-year mark, there is little doubt -- The Voyagers are going the distance.

So, Tell Me Again… What Killed the Dinosaurs?

Posted by Guy Pirro 10/09/2019 06:34PM

So, Tell Me Again… What Killed the Dinosaurs?

The demise of the dinosaurs is the world's ultimate who-dunit. Was it an asteroid impact? Volcanic eruptions? Climate change? Too many pesky mammals running around eating dino eggs? All of the above? None of the above? Two main camps exist in paleontology today, each having a different view of what killed the dinosaurs and other organisms at the time of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) boundary: A large asteroid impact in the Yucatan Peninsula or volcanic eruptions worldwide, but predominantly in the Deccan Traps of India. Controversy has surrounded the topic for the last four decades and it has become difficult for the general public (and the scientific community at large) to understand the issue due to the tangled assemblage of data which seems to point in many different directions. Luckily, the controversy has not harmed the study of mass extinction causation, but rather has made it a more dynamic and interesting area of study. There has been no settlement to the issue so far, and no clear one is foreseeable. In general, it seems that many paleontologists lean towards the volcanic eruptions side, while many astronomers and physicists favor the asteroid impact side. Geologists are probably evenly split between the two. But recent evidence suggests that the answer may be a combination of the two theories, with the ultimate killer being global climate change triggered by the two events in tandem. It looks like the asteroid that killed off the dinosaurs probably rang the Earth like a bell, triggering super-volcanic eruptions around the globe that may have contributed to the devastation – A one-two punch that ultimately killed-off 75 percent of life on the planet.

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of October 2019

Posted by Guy Pirro 09/29/2019 04:40PM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of October 2019

Welcome to the night sky report for October 2019 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. Crisp, clear October nights are full of celestial showpieces. Find Pegasus, the flying horse of Greek myth, to pinpoint dense globular star clusters and galaxies, including our neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy (M31, NGC224). Watch for views of M15 (NGC7078) and NGC7331. The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.

Honoring the 24 Brave Souls Who Made the Trip to the Moon and Back

Posted by Guy Pirro 09/10/2019 02:49AM

Honoring the 24 Brave Souls Who Made the Trip to the Moon and Back

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing in 1969. In all, twenty four courageous astronauts risked their lives while traveling from the Earth to the Moon and back between 1968 and 1972. Twelve of these astronauts actually set foot on the Moon. Yet it is hard to believe that out of this elite group of twelve, only four of the Moon walkers are still alive today. As we prepare for the next wave of Moon walkers in the coming decades, these first twenty four voyagers should forever be remembered for their contributions to the exploration of space as part of the ambitious Apollo Program – an undertaking so bold and difficult, that it has achieved an iconic stature in the history of mankind.

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of September 2019

Posted by Guy Pirro 09/02/2019 07:33PM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of September 2019

Welcome to the night sky report for September 2019 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. In September, Pegasus becomes increasingly prominent in the southeastern sky, allowing stargazers to locate globular star clusters and a double star, Alpha Capricorni. Look for lovely crescent Moons at the start and end of the month. The September equinox brings the beginning of fall in the Northern Hemisphere. And Mars is at solar conjunction, meaning it has disappeared from night skies. The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.