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Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of January 2019

Posted by Guy Pirro 01/08/2019 12:48PM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of January 2019

Happy New Year and welcome to the night sky report for January 2019 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. In January, the northern hemisphere features beautiful views of the binary star Capella - a pair of giant yellow stars, Aldebaran - a red giant star, two star clusters—the Hyades (Caldwell 41) and the Pleiades (M45), and the Crab Nebula (M1). The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.

The Falcon (New Horizons) and the Snowman (Ultima Thule)

Posted by Guy Pirro 01/03/2019 06:48PM

The Falcon (New Horizons) and the Snowman (Ultima Thule)

Following its successful fly-by of Pluto in July 2015, NASA's New Horizons mission has now performed a second fly-by – this time of an entirely new kind of world deep in the Kuiper Belt. NASA scientists released the first detailed images of the most distant object ever explored — the Kuiper Belt object Ultima Thule. Its remarkable appearance -- two spherical objects touching together in the shape of a snowman, unlike anything we've seen before -- sheds new light on the processes that built our Solar System planets four and a half billion years ago. New Horizon’s images of Ultima Thule unveil the very first stages of our Solar System's history.

Tangled Magnetic Fields in Black Holes Create the Most Powerful Particle Accelerators in the Universe

Posted by Guy Pirro 12/14/2018 06:53PM

Tangled Magnetic Fields in Black Holes Create the Most Powerful Particle Accelerators in the Universe

Magnetic field lines tangled like spaghetti in a bowl, as found in black holes, might be behind the most powerful particle accelerators in the universe. That’s the result of a new computational study by researchers from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which simulated particle emissions from distant active galaxies. SLAC scientists have found a new way to explain how these black hole plasma jets boost particles to the highest energies observed in the universe. The results could prove useful for fusion and accelerator research on Earth.

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of December 2018

Posted by Guy Pirro 12/03/2018 12:30AM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of December 2018

Welcome to the night sky report for December 2018 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. Saturn’s iconic rings are clearly visible with backyard telescopes in early December. Mercury and Venus appear later in the month. Also look for Eta Cassiopeiae, a double star, with binoculars or a small telescope to discern its gold and blue hues. Finally, don’t miss the mid-December Geminid meteor shower. You could see as many as 60 colorful meteors per hour. The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.

NASA’s InSight - Ten Days Until Touchdown on Mars

Posted by Guy Pirro 11/17/2018 11:31PM

NASA’s InSight - Ten Days Until Touchdown on Mars

NASA’s current mission to Mars -- InSight -- is expected to land on the Red Planet on November 26, 2018. Only about 40 percent of the missions ever sent to Mars -- by any space agency -- have been successful. The US is the only nation whose missions have survived a Mars landing. The thin atmosphere -- just 1 percent of Earth’s -- means that there’s little friction to slow down a spacecraft. Despite that, NASA has had a long and successful track record at Mars. Since 1965, it has flown-by, orbited, landed on, and roved across the surface of the Red Planet. InSight, short for “Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport,” is designed to give Mars its first thorough check-up since it formed 4.5 billion years ago. InSight complements the numerous missions that are orbiting Mars and roving around on the planet's surface. The lander's science instruments will look for tectonic activity and meteorite impacts on Mars, study how much heat is still flowing through the planet, and track the planet's wobble as it orbits the Sun. This will help answer key questions about how the rocky planets of the Solar System formed.

After a “Stellar” Career, Kepler Space Telescope Retires in Place

Posted by Guy Pirro 11/08/2018 07:56PM

After a “Stellar” Career, Kepler Space Telescope Retires in Place

After nine years in deep space collecting data that indicates our sky is filled with billions of hidden planets, NASA’s Kepler space telescope has run out of the vital fuel needed for further science operations. NASA has decided to retire the spacecraft within its current, safe orbit, away from Earth. Kepler leaves a legacy of more than 2600 planet discoveries from outside our solar system, many of which could be promising places for life. But there is still much data that has been collected and is yet to be analyzed. Scientists are expected to spend the next decade or more in search of new discoveries in the treasure trove of data that Kepler has amassed.

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of November 2018

Posted by Guy Pirro 11/01/2018 09:33PM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of November 2018

Welcome to the night sky report for November 2018 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. Some fish (Pisces), a ram (Aries), and a triangle (Triangulum) are all found in the November night sky. Also be sure to catch the Taurid meteor shower, which features 5 to 10 meteors per hour on its peak night of November 5 to 6. In addition, meteors will be radiating from the constellation Leo on the evening of November 17th and the early morning of November 18th. The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.

My Ex-Girlfriend Always Said I Was a Neanderthal – She Was Right

Posted by Guy Pirro 10/23/2018 12:34AM

My Ex-Girlfriend Always Said I Was a Neanderthal – She Was Right

Neanderthals lived in Europe and parts of Asia until they became extinct about 40,000 years ago. For more than a hundred years, paleontologists and anthropologists have been striving to uncover the evolutionary relationship of Neanderthals to modern humans. What does the Neanderthal genome divulge about modern humans, and how do we differ from each other? Which human capacities and characteristics hark back to Neanderthals? Why did our closest relative become extinct? One thing is now certain -- the Neanderthal and modern humans interbred -- and today we are far more closely related than we previously believed. Recently, Stanford University scientists have found that interbreeding between Neanderthals and modern humans may have given modern humans some important genetic tools needed to survive – One being the ability to combat viral infections.

10 Trillion Frame-per-Second Camera Captures Photon Pulses in Mid-Air

Posted by Guy Pirro 10/16/2018 05:09AM

10 Trillion Frame-per-Second Camera Captures Photon Pulses in Mid-Air

What happens when a new technology is so advanced and precise that it operates on a scale beyond our ability to accurately characterize and measure? That happens when lasers used to produce ultrashort pulses in the femtosecond range (10 ^-15 seconds) are far too short to visualize. Although some measurements are possible, nothing beats a clear image according to researchers at INRS (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique), a part of the Universite du Quebec network in Canada. Working with colleagues at Caltech, they have developed T-CUP, the world’s fastest camera, capable of capturing ten trillion (10 ^13) frames per second. This new camera literally captures photon pulses in mid-air and makes it possible to freeze time and see phenomena in extremely slow motion.

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of October 2018

Posted by Guy Pirro 10/09/2018 04:41PM

Kiss the Sky Tonight -- Month of October 2018

Welcome to the night sky report for October 2018 -- Your guide to the constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and celestial events that are observable during the month. Look for Pegasus, the great winged horse of Greek mythology, prancing across the autumn night sky. Binoculars and small telescopes will reveal the glowing nucleus and spiral arms of our neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy. Don’t miss the Orionid meteor shower, which peaks on the night of October 21 to 22. The night sky is truly a celestial showcase. Get outside and explore its wonders from your own backyard.

Does Modified Newtonian Dynamics Negate the Need for Dark Matter?

Posted by Guy Pirro 09/21/2018 01:14AM

Does Modified Newtonian Dynamics Negate the Need for Dark Matter?

Galaxies rotate so quickly that they should fly apart according to the existing laws of physics. Two current theories attempt to explain this anomaly – the first places a halo of an imaginary and as of yet undetected substance called “Dark Matter” around every galaxy. The second, Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), explains this by applying a mathematical compensation to Newtonian physics that strengthens the visible material’s gravity, but only where it gets very weak. Otherwise, gravity follows Newton’s conventional laws, as in our Solar System. Recently, an international group of astrophysicists has concluded that MOND provides a very viable explanation for the galaxy rotation anomaly and that Dark Mater does not exist. Their summary: It is remarkable that MOND continues to make such successful predictions based on equations written down 35 years ago. Throughout history, we have seen many examples where scientists have simply invented ideas out of thin air to help explain away things that are just not understood at the time. In some ways, Dark Matter and Dark Energy bring to mind another imaginary concept -- the so called "Aether Wind" of the 1800s. Back then, everybody just "knew" that space was filled with an "Aether Wind." The problem was that no one had ever seen it or measured it… And in 1887, when Albert Michelson and Edward Morley set out to prove the existence of Aether Wind once and for all, their experiment failed spectacularly -- There was no such thing. Michelson eventually won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1907 for this work and became the first American to do so. Will the concepts of Dark Matter and Dark Energy meet the same fate as the Aether Wind of the 19th century? Time will tell.

Yes Virginia, Pluto Really is a Planet

Posted by Guy Pirro 09/12/2018 12:33AM

Yes Virginia, Pluto Really is a Planet

What is a planet? For generations the answer was easy -- A big ball of rock or gas that orbited the Sun... And there were nine of them in our Solar System. But then astronomers started finding more Pluto-sized objects orbiting beyond Neptune. Then they found Jupiter-sized objects circling distant stars -- First by the handful and then by the hundreds. Suddenly the answer wasn't so easy. Were all these newly found things planets? The International Astronomical Union (IAU), the organization that is in charge of naming newly discovered worlds, tackled the question at their 2006 meeting. They tried to come up with a definition of a planet that everyone could agree on. But the astronomers couldn't agree, so they voted and picked a definition that they thought would work. The results have been mixed. In the end, the IAU did accomplish one thing -- They figured out a way to turn something simple into something complex. Now, a recent study by the University of Central Florida concludes that the reason Pluto lost its status as a planet is not valid and that a proper definition of a planet should be based on its intrinsic properties rather than ones that can change, such as the dynamics of a planet’s orbit -- the rationale that was used by the IAU to strip Pluto of its planetary status.