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Cassini Prepares for its September 15th Death Dive into Saturn

09/12/2017 06:15PM

Cassini Prepares for its September 15th Death Dive into Saturn

After two decades in space, NASA's Cassini spacecraft is nearing the end of its remarkable journey of exploration. Having expended almost every bit of its rocket propellant, operators are deliberately plunging Cassini into the giant planet to ensure that Saturn's moons will remain pristine and uncontaminated for future exploration -- in particular, the ice covered, ocean-bearing moon Enceladus, and Titan, with its intriguing pre-biotic chemistry. From its launch in 1997 to its upcoming Grand Finale, the Cassini-Huygens mission has racked up a remarkable list of achievements, and in the process has paved the way for the next generation of probes that will explore the four outer gaseous planets.


Comments:

  • Tenagra [Michael Schwartz]
  • 09/14/2017 06:33PM
What can you say about such a fantastic mission? I think it has been hard at work for 9 years studying the rings, moons, life possible worlds. And now it has a beautiful suicide, like a female samurai knowing that there are fates worse than death. I forget the female astronomer's name but she wrote about Cassini using elegant prose and I told her so.<br><br>Let's hope that we visit again, this time with Galileo's penetrating radar and a much better probe into Titan. Technology has come a long way since Cassini was launched. We can unfold more miracles.<br><br>Thanks, Cassina. RIP<br><br>Michael Schwartz<br>Dir. Tenagra Observatories, Ltd.<br>NASA Grant Recipient
<br><br>Well stated, Michael.<br><br>Together, Cassini and Huygens clearly exceeded all expectations.<br><br>The mission has changed the way we think about looking for possible lifeforms on other planets.<br><br>Now, on to the next generation of robotic explorers.<br><br>Thanks,<br><br>Guy Pirro<br><br><br><br><br><blockquote class="blockquote"><div class="italic"><i>Michael Schwartz said:</i><br><br>What can you say about such a fantastic mission? I think it has been hard at work for 9 years studying the rings, moons, life possible worlds. And now it has a beautiful suicide, like a female samurai knowing that there are fates worse than death. I forget the female astronomer's name but she wrote about Cassini using elegant prose and I told her so.<br><br>Let's hope that we visit again, this time with Galileo's penetrating radar and a much better probe into Titan. Technology has come a long way since Cassini was launched. We can unfold more miracles.<br><br>Thanks, Cassina. RIP<br><br>Michael Schwartz<br>Dir. Tenagra Observatories, Ltd.<br>NASA Grant Recipient</div></blockquote>