Image of the day

Captured by
RICHARD COFER

Trifid Nebula

My Account

New to Astromart?

Register an account...

Need Help?

Hubble Breaks the Cosmic Distance Record with a Redshift of 11.1

03/18/2016 08:13AM

Hubble Breaks the Cosmic Distance Record with a Redshift of 11.1

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is an amazing time machine. By looking back through space, astronomers actually look back through time. Now, by pushing Hubble to its limits, a team of astronomers has shattered the cosmic distance record by viewing the farthest galaxy ever seen. Named GN-z11, this surprisingly bright, infant galaxy is seen as it was 13.4 billion years in the past. GN-z11 is located in the direction of the constellation of Ursa Major. The astronomers saw it as it existed just 400 million years after the Big Bang, when the universe was only three percent of its current age. At a spectroscopically confirmed redshift of 11.1, the galaxy is even farther away than originally thought. At a billion solar masses, it is producing stars surprisingly quickly for such an early time. This new record will most likely stand until the launch of Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will look even deeper into the universe for early galaxies.


Comments:

There are no comments yet.