Image of the day

From the
ATWB Customer Gallery

LAPLACE SUNSET

My Account

New to Astromart?

Register an account...

Need Help?

If you have any questions or experiencing an issue please report to support@astromart.com

Observing Pluto

Started by bikeboy, 08/25/2018 02:05AM
Posted 10/16/2018 05:00AM #10
Update on M31-G1:

This weekend my wife and I camped two nights at Convict Lake, which is on the east side of the Sierra Nevada about 6 miles south of the town of Mammoth Lakes.  The elevation is about 7600'.  I brought my 11" for personal observing and to entertain the rest of our group, which consisted of about a dozen co-workers from several of our California offices, none of whom I had met before and only one I had talked to before.  The campground is dark…if you ignore the two nearby restrooms with interior lights shining through gable windows, nearby campfires, and vehicles driving around.

On Saturday night around 9:45 p.m., with transparency excellent, seeing ranging from good (modest wind) to great (calm), and the temperature in the mid 30s, I spotted G1 with direct vision using three eyepieces:  41 mm Panoptic, 13 mm Ethos, and 8 mm Delos.  I thought the 13 Ethos gave me the best view.  I duplicated this observation an hour later with the temperature down to 32°F.  The second view was a little better because Andromeda had climbed another 15°.  A few minutes before the second observation, and with the Milky Way still high in the sky, I recorded an average SQM reading of 21.39 mag/sq-arcsec.

Fred
Posted 10/16/2018 04:04PM #11
Fred,

Good work on completing your observation challenge!  I enjoy looking at the bright brilliant NGC and M objects, but I will say I have a new found respect for these long term challenging observation adventures.  Having more aperture opens up a whole list of new objects to look at.  I think I am going to have to shot for G1 now that you have mentioned it:-)  I also would to try for Triton.

Sounds like you had a great night of observing with good sky conditions.  That always helps.

Keep Looking Up,

Bob 
Posted 10/16/2018 05:33PM #12
Triton is a good one.  I've seen it several times in the 11", but never in the 8" even though it is within range.  I also spotted three of Uranus's moons (Titania, Oberon, and Ariel) the same night as one of my Triton observations, but they weren't easy.  In a friend's 20" Obsession that night, I easily saw four of Uranus' moons (adding Umbriel).

Another fun one is Hadley Rille, where Apollo 15 landed.  I've seen it in the 8" and the 11".  The moon phase needs to be just right so that one wall is still in shadow, while the other wall is getting direct sunlight.  The scene is then gray-white-black-gray.  IIRC, it's best seen about one or two days past first quarter.