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Crab Pulsar Sets New Record for High Energy Photons

08/12/2016 10:27AM

Crab Pulsar Sets New Record for High Energy Photons

The Crab Nebula is the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed on Earth in the year 1054. The pulsar at the center of the Crab Nebula is extremely small, with a diameter of just around ten kilometers, and rotates around its own axis at approximately 30 times per second. Thus, it emits light pulses like a lighthouse and these pulses stretch across the entire electromagnetic spectrum -- from long radio waves, to visible light, to the short waves of energetic gamma rays. Recent observations show that the Crab Pulsar has now set a new record. It is sending out the most energetic light radiation, in the form of photons, that has ever been measured from a star. This could challenge our current understanding of pulsars.


Comments:

  • wcarter3 [William Carter]
  • 08/14/2016 12:33PM
Guy,<br><br>Your articles are always excellent (the latest science) and often elaborate on objects we actually observe. Keep up the great work.<br><br>Bill Carter
<br>Bill:<br><br>Thanks for the kind words.<br><br>I hope all of the folks on AstroMart enjoy reading these news items as much as I enjoy posting them. I try to select topics related to discoveries that are unique and often not expected -- Those are the ones that interest me the most.<br><br>At times I'll try to explain the science behind the discoveries as best as I can, but frankly even the experts who "live and breathe" this stuff often have a difficult time reconciling their findings with what they "think" they know.<br><br>It seems that the more we learn about the Universe, the more we realize how little we really do know.<br><br>Thanks again,<br><br>Guy Pirro<br><br><br><br><br><blockquote class="blockquote"><div class="italic"><i>William Carter said:</i><br><br>Guy,<br><br>Your articles are always excellent (the latest science) and often elaborate on objects we actually observe. Keep up the great work.<br><br>Bill Carter</div></blockquote>